Our Visionaries

Programs

Register for Summer Camp today!

3 one-week sessions this July 8-25

This July, AVAM hosts another truly visionary experience for students, with 3 one-week sessions of hands-on arts programs at the national museum for intuitive, self-taught artistry! Students will learn about visionary art as they explore new & unusual materials, create their own unique art projects, and experience a special week-long Visiting Artist workshop. SIGN UP TODAY! Contact amy@avam.org or call 410-244-1900 x232 to register.

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Membership

Join AVAM's Fan Club Today

Join AVAM's Fan Club Today

Did you know Fan Club Members get FREE admission year-round, plus discounts on our fabulous workshops, exclusive FREE admission to our annual exhibition Preview Party, big discounts at Sideshow & Mr. Rain's Fun House, plus a whole lot more!

Join Online Today!

Fan Club Benefits

 

Martin Ramirez

(1895–1963)

When Martin Ramirez came to America in 1925 it was to get work building railroads in Northern California but he did not remain in this profession for very long. While in America he wrote letters to his wife and four children in Mexico and drew pictures in the margins until he was hospitalized in the early '30s and diagnosed with schizophrenia. He was initially confined at Stockholm State Hospital, where he began to create his drawings, using whatever available bits of paper he could find, usually glued together with paste made of bread or potatoes and saliva. In 1948, he was transferred to DeWitt State Hospital in Auburn where he was to spend the remainder of his life. It was there that he met the Finish psychologist and artist, Tarmo Pasto. Dr. Pasto was taken by Ramirez's work and began to bring him materials and save his drawings. At one point Pasto even lived on the DeWitt grounds in order to observe Ramirez every day. In the early '50s, Dr. Pasto helped arrange four shows for Ramirez, primarily on college campuses, including Syracuse University. In 1955 he sent ten drawings to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum but never heard back from them. An intern found the drawings in the mid '90s and by 1997 they were officially accessioned.